markthespotSo I’m sure everyone has already heard about Dan Lyons (the fake Steve Jobs) suggested Operation Chokehold where everyone slams AT&T’s network by running high volume data apps. Well, I cannot say I’m in favor of the idea because I KNOW AT&T is quite aware of the limitations of their network, of which Ralph de la Vega, president and chief executive for mobility and consumer markets has admitted as much, and further more, how is this going to affect anything?  Great, we bring the system ‘down to its knees’ for a few hours. AT&T feel worse … and that is about it.  No value.

Now, there is a counter movement that I WILL participate in; Operation Feedback. I found out about this through the press release channel and it makes sense.  Instead of a DNS attack on AT&T, we should instead use the iphone app Mark The Spot app (by AT&T funny enough) to report every instance of any dropped call or interruption, an purposely go out of our way to find our well, and not so well known dead points.  This makes more sense from proactive point of view.  Not only can we ‘make noise’ about the weak service from AT&T, but we can actually help in trying to improve the service.  If AT&T suddenly got lots of information about dropped calls, perhaps they may be able to improve the situation. (if only somewhat). Credit Ryan Ritchey from The Digital Lifestyle for this idea.

5 comments on “Fighting the AT&T power.. kindly

  • People who support "Operation Chokehold" aren't motivated by dead spots or "poor voice quality," they just want to see AT&T back up their claims. Here is a quote from cDizzle, a comment poster from theDigitalLife.tv:

    "If you are going to sell us a device that's locked to your network, and shackle us to a two year contract, you better be damned sure that it's going to do what you promise. I, for one, am sick and tired of US wireless networks chipping away at the promises they have already made. Why have text messages gone UP in price over the years? Why does "unlimited" mean up to 5GB/mo? Because they hold all the cards, that's why. If a few people are inconvenienced by AT&T's network being choked out for an hour, that's unfortunate, but AT&T has repeatedly offered me less and packaged it as more."

    Moreover, this "Operation Feedback" powered by the "Mark the Spot" app is only a small piece of why AT&T users are upset with their service, and is a poor alternative to "Operation Chokehold."

  • I agree to a point. I even responded to that comment on the site..

    >I agree that AT&T has over promised and under delivered, but really.. There is NO way a DNS attack on AT&T is going to say anything, and in truth, its not going to work. Even if 10,000 users attacked the network, it would just slow down, not crash. Really, if you want to protest, jailbreak your phone and go to T-Mobile or some other carrier. Or as I plan to do, jump ship altogether once the right Android phone comes out.

    My main point is, what is going to be gained by the outcome? AT&T already knows they are pissing people off. Its a business decision.. How much money are we willing to spend to keep people from jumping ship? There is a REASON the phones are discounted when you sign a 2 year plan; so that they can raise the bar of what you are willing to put up with before you leave. In our case, if you want to use the iPhone you have no choice short of going to t-Moble, which is only a 1/2 solution since you cannot get 3G.
    Apple will, in time, open up to other carriers. They have to because of the ground Android is making. When that happens, what how fast people leave AT&T. THAT will be the most effect protest of all.

  • Let's just re-create the comment chain from the other site 🙂

    I definitely agree that this DoS attack will have little to no effect, but I guess to some degree it can be regarded as a public outcry. A "we won't stand for this any more" kind of message, even if it is pretty insignificant. At the very least, the more news/blogs/tweets regarding issues like this, the more bad press AT&T will be collecting.

  • Actually, given all the hoopla from this debate in the first place, I would say mission accomplished! Everyone is talking about it, Dan was on the radio yesterday saying he was not serious, and you know there will be posts later today on how it went. Heck, given all the chatter, this has worked out even better then an invisible DNS attack as far as letting AT&T know we are not happy.

  • there is a counter movement that I WILL participate in; Operation Feedback. I found out about this through the press release channel and it makes sense. Instead of a DNS attack on AT&T,.
    I cannot say I’m in favor of the idea because I KNOW AT&T is quite aware of the limitations of their network, of which Ralph de la Vega, president and chief executive for mobility and consumer markets has admitted as much, and further more, how is this going to affect anything?

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